Featured Book: The Butterfly Hours by Patty Dann

PATTY DANN Book“Patty Dann has collected 25 years of teaching experience in this generous book of advice to writers. She delivers a series of prompts that open up tiny worlds of memory and feeling. If God is in the details, God is here.”—Betsy Lerner, author of The Forest for the Trees

“Seamlessly blending writing wisdom with memoir, The Butterfly Hours promises to spark not only your writing, but also your heart. This book is a testament to why writing continues to be one of humankind’s most essential superpowers.”—Laraine Herring, author of Writing Begins with the Breath and On Being Stuck


“If all books could be this wonderful! From the first page, I fell in love with Patty Dann’s warm, witty, sound advice and the glimpses into her own life. Refreshingly modest and gently profound, The Butterfly Hours is a treasure—and the perfect present for all who feel they have memories to share. Brava, Patty Dann. I so loved this book.”—Elinor Lipman, author of The View from Penthouse B and I Can’t Complain

 

About the Author

PATTY DANN was cited by New York magazine as one of the “Great Teachers of NYC.” She has an MFA in Writing from Columbia University and a BA from the University of Oregon. She has taught at Sarah Lawrence College and the West Side YMCA, where she currently teaches memoir classes. Her class used to be limited to students ages fifty-five and over because she found that it often took decades for people to write the truth, but now she opens her classes to all ages. Dann is the author of three novels, including Mermaids, which was turned into a film starring Cher, Winona Ryder, Christina Ricci, and Bob Hoskins, and two memoirs. She lives in New York City, where she is a member of New York Writers Workshop.

The Gymnast and Other Positions by Jacqueline Bishop

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How Many Letters Are In Goodbye? by Yvonne Cassidy

How Many Letters US_finalartSeventeen-year-old Rhea Farrell carries the scars of a childhood accident in which she lost her arm. But she also carries scars that aren’t so visible—the loss of a mother she hardly remembers, the impact of her father’s drinking and her confusion and pain around accepting her sexuality.

When Rhea runs away, she turns to the person she always wished she could confide in—her mother. And just like she used to do as a little girl, Rhea starts to write her letters—to tell her things she can’t tell anyone else, to share her fears, to ask for help. Rhea’s journey on the streets of New York brings her deeper into her mother’s past where she uncovers buried family secrets. And as she finds out more about the woman her mother truly was, Rhea also discovers just what kind of woman she wants to be.

 

Advance Praise:

“It’s a powerhouse of emotion. My heart is now stretched into new shapes.”

—Kirstin Cronn-Mills, Stonewall Award-winning author of Beautiful Music for Ugly Children

“Heavy and intense, this book will make readers confront their own senses of identity.”—Kirkus Reviews

“A heartbreaking story about the challenges of trusting, healing, and saying goodbye.”—School Library Journal

 

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